How to Make Espresso in a French Press: Easy Instructions

If mastering how to make espresso in a French press is a must for you, check out our detailed instructions. Learn to make great coffee on your own!
By
reviewed
Reviewed by
Last updatedLast updated: September 22, 2021
Coffee Statistics is reader-supported. We may earn a commission through products purchased using links on this page. Learn more about our process here
Coffee Statistics is reader-supported. We may earn a commission through products purchased using links on this page. Learn more about our process here

According to research statistics, the average cost of a cup of coffee in the USA is $2.70 Trusted Source Americans Pay an Average $2.70 for Coffee, While Tipping 20 Percent Enjoying a cup of coffee is a daily, revitalizing ritual for many Americans – but amid the rush of waiting in line at bistros and cafes one might wonder how much they should tip or whether they are being overcharged. www.usnews.com So, if you need a cup to get you going in the morning, you could save hundreds of dollars a year, if you learn how to make espresso in a French press at home.

A good quality espresso can be the foundation for a variety of coffee drinks, so once you master this skill, you can make yourself barista quality beverages without the coffeeshop price tag. In this article, we’ll explore French press recipes and the pros and cons of using a French press, so you can make an informed decision about whether you should purchase one for your home.

French Press Espresso - Recipe

Mary Jankins
Traditional espresso is prepared by pushing hot water through finely ground, tightly packed coffee with at least nine bars of pressure. A French Press does not exert this kind of pressure, but it can still make a smooth, strong and dark shot.
Prep Time 4 mins
Cook Time 6 mins
Course Coffee
Servings 1 people
Calories 2 kcal

Equipment

  • French press
  • Mug or cup

Ingredients
  

  • 2 tbsp Espresso grounds coarse grind
  • 250 ml Boiled water

Instructions
 

  • As we mentioned above, you’ll need a coarser coffee bean blend to make French press espresso. If you have a good quality grinder, you can adjust your grinder settings, otherwise, you will need to gauge it for yourself and experiment a little. Remember, that the quality of your coffee beans will also influence the flavor and consistency of your espresso. The best quality beans will impart a strong, smooth flavor that is not harsh.
  • Thermal stability and temperature are essential to make a good quality espresso shot. If you’ve used an espresso machine, you may have learned to keep the portafilter in the machine as it is heating up. Since a French press is different, you will need to warm it separately. Fortunately, this is quite simple. All you need to do is fill the press with some warm water and allow it to sit for a few minutes. This provides the ideal time to heat the water to make your espresso. Heat the water as you would if you were making a cup of tea. You’ll need at least 195ºf.
  • Next, you’ll need to put the coffee grounds into your French press. Since the grind is more coarse than with an espresso machine, you will need more coffee to get the same strong, smooth shot. A good ratio is two tablespoons of coffee for each cup of water.
    However, if you’re wondering how much coffee to put in a French press to make a double shot espresso, simply double the quantity.
    Add a small amount of water that will allow the coffee to “bloom”. This provides an opportunity for the coffee to release all the natural oils and develop a strong flavor.
  • Once the coffee has bloomed, you can then add the rest of the water and stir the contents. You can then add the lid and allow the coffee to steep for at least a few minutes. If you like a stronger coffee, leave it brewing for longer. Putting the lid on the French press will prevent heat escaping, in fact, the best French press models have an excellent seal. But, regardless of your press, do not press down the plunger at this point.
    After three to five minutes, you can press the plunger down slowly and steadily. Your espresso is then ready to drink.

Pros and Сons of French Press Espresso

The French press has been around for almost 100 years Trusted Source French Press - The History & Brewing Guide - Perfect Daily Grind You might know it as a cafetiére, plunger or French press, but the truth is that there have been several patents with different names and from different origins for this popular brewing device. A history lesson is in order to help understand all the bickering behind the origin of this device. perfectdailygrind.com and it is a solid method of making espresso, but it is not perfect. There are both pros and cons associated with this method.

The main benefit is that the equipment is inexpensive and easy to store. You don’t need to worry about buying an expensive machine that could dominate your countertops. French presses can make consistently good coffee and the learning curve for how to properly make espresso coffee in a French press is fairly minimal.

The downsides include that it can be a little less safe compared to other methods. You will need to boil water and pour it into the press, which takes more time and can lead to safety issues unless you pay close attention to what you’re doing. Additionally, you do need to keep an eye on how long the coffee is steeping or you could end up with a coffee that is either so strong you can’t drink it or that tastes like dishwater.How to Make Espresso in a French Press: Easy Instructions

Final Thoughts

A French press is a fairly inexpensive way to make barista quality espresso in your own home. However, you do need to learn the proper method of how to make espresso in a French press. Fortunately, there is a minimal learning curve and once you master this skill, you’ll be able to wow your friends and dinner party guests with an array of delicious coffee drinks.

References

1.
Americans Pay an Average $2.70 for Coffee, While Tipping 20 Percent
Enjoying a cup of coffee is a daily, revitalizing ritual for many Americans – but amid the rush of waiting in line at bistros and cafes one might wonder how much they should tip or whether they are being overcharged.
2.
French Press - The History & Brewing Guide - Perfect Daily Grind
You might know it as a cafetiére, plunger or French press, but the truth is that there have been several patents with different names and from different origins for this popular brewing device. A history lesson is in order to help understand all the bickering behind the origin of this device.
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recipe Rating